These future pods may be able to assist cities in resolving traffic congestion issues.

 These future pods may be able to assist cities in resolving traffic congestion issues.

Cities around the world are grappling with traffic congestion, with some turning to electric scooters for relief and others to AI-enabled traffic lights.

However, one startup believes that building a network of driverless high-speed pods suspended from a steel track around cities is the answer.




uSky Transport, based in Belarus, launched a 400-meter test line in Sharjah, which borders Dubai in the United Arab Emirates, in June.

The electrically powered pods are glossy white on the outside, with mood lighting, lounge music, and floor-to-ceiling windows to make them feel like a first-class flight suite. 

The vehicle under examination can accommodate up to four passengers thanks to two comfortable armchairs and two foldable seats.


According to uSky, a fully integrated city-wide network could serve 10,000 people per hour, with cars capable of travelling up to 150 kilometres (93 miles) per hour — though they can't achieve their top speed on the test track for safety reasons.

According to the corporation, the goal is to free up road and ground space that might be used for plants, walkways, and public recreation areas. 

"People are tired of traffic bottlenecks because the ground level is entirely saturated. People are fed up with pollution "uSky Transport's CEO, Oleg Zaretskiy, says

According to uSky, a fully integrated city-wide network could serve 10,000 people per hour, with cars capable of travelling up to 150 kilometres (93 miles) per hour — though they can't achieve their top speed on the test track for safety reasons.

Innovating in the field of mobility

Monorails and cable cars are occasionally used to compare transport pods that go above the earth, also known as "sky pods." However, according to Stephanie Haag, associate partner at McKinsey & Company, they provide more freedom.

"You just have one car on a cable car, and it always goes at the same speed," she explains. "On that particular infrastructure, [sky pods] can use many different cabins," such as those designed for shorter flights in metropolitan areas or longer distances.

Although she warns that avoiding congestion in a bustling city-wide network would necessitate careful planning, Haag believes it may still be a widely adopted option if the promises of increased mobility and sustainability are kept.

Previous Post Next Post